Here’s What Will Happen to You When You Stop Working Out

Okay, you’ve managed to keep up with your workout regimen for months now and suddenly – it happens…  Life happens, which got into the way of your fitness routine.  Maybe you became too busy… got sick or injured… had a long relaxing vacation… or maybe you’re just tired and uninspired?  Whatever reason or excuse you have, your body doesn’t care.  The hiatus will cause your body to have those unwanted changes.

So what really happens when you stop working out?

You will gain weight.

Yes, within a week or so, your muscles start to lose their fat-burning potential and your metabolism begins to slow down.  So make sure to watch your diet during the hiatus and get back on track ASAP!

Your muscles will shrink.

According to a study, there is a significant decline in muscles mass after 2 weeks of complete rest.  So you might just see your quads and biceps starting to shrink.  Once you hit the gym again, it will take more time for you to rebuild your muscle mass than it took you to lose it.

Your endurance and stamina will decrease.

You may find yourself getting tired and gasping for breath way faster than you used to.  Within 2 weeks of not working out, the amount of oxygen on your working muscles decreases by as much as 20%.

You become sad and stressed.

Exercise releases endorphins which trigger a positive feeling to the body.  Therefore, physical inactivity inhibits the release of these happy hormones, leaving you stressed, moody and sometimes depressed.

Your will have even more cravings than usual.

When you exercise, you get inspired to also watch what you eat.   The changes in mood decrease in energy and lack of physical activity can actually make you crave for unhealthy “comfort foods” even more.

Now let me ask you, do you really need and still want to take a break from working out?  I don’t think so.

About Toni Marie

Toni is Senior Editor for GuestDietBlog, as well as a contributing author. In addition to writing about diet and health, she also likes to write about relationships. She is also a nurse, and the primary caregiver for her mother.
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